The EU Whistleblowing Directive

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How to get compliant with the Whistleblowing Law

The aim of the EU Whistleblowing Directive (2019/1937) is to protect anyone who reports work-related misconduct. This calls for organisations to review their approach to whistleblowing to ensure it meets the Directive’s requirements. Learn what employers need to do to comply.

DIRECTIVE REQUIREMENTSWhistleblower directive’s impact on organisations

To meet the requirement of the EU Whistleblower Directive, organisations with 50+ employees and municipalities with over 10,000 inhabitants must implement secure and effective reporting channels.

These channels have to:

Be secure

Guarantee confidentiality

Have a designated owner

Adhere to timeframes

Meet GDPR guidelines

Allow written and/or verbal reports

INTERNAL REPORTING CHANNELSPenalties for non-compliance

The EU Whistleblower Directive doesn’t set minimum penalties, but it requires national versions of the law to penalise against those who prevent reporting, break confidentiality, or retaliate against whistleblowers.

EU WHISTLEBLOWING DIRECTIVE - KEY DATESDeadline to implement reporting channels

For organisations with 250+ employees and municipalities with 10,000+ inhabitants.

For organisations with 50 – 249 employees.

IMPORTANT DETAILSMore on the EU
Whistleblowing Directive

Report misconduct at the workplace

Any stakeholder with information on work-related misconduct can submit a report. It isn’t limited to employees, this also includes former employees, job applicants, contractors, suppliers and supporters of the whistleblower.

What can be reported as whistleblowing?

Violations of EU law on a range of work-related issues. Including, but not limited to, money laundering, tax fraud, product and transport safety, data protection, public health, animal welfare and environmental protection.

Whistleblower protection

Whistleblowers are protected against any form of retaliation. The whistleblower must submit their concern through the designated reporting channel and believe the information is true at the time of reporting.

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WEBINARTHE WHISTLEBLOWING LAW

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Everything you'd like to know and how the Directive impacts youFrequently asked questions

Whistleblowing is when someone raises concerns about wrongdoing within a public, private or government organisation. This is usually illegal, unethical, or harmful activity such as fraud, corruption, misconduct, harassment, discrimination or health, safety or environmental violations.

Whistleblowers in the EU are protected against any form of retaliation if they report breaches of EU law on a range of issues.

These include violations relating to: 

  • Financial services
  • Money laundering and terrorist financing
  • Public procurement
  • Public health
  • Public safety – products, food and transport
  • Environmental protection, radiation protection and nuclear safety
  • Animal health and welfare
  • Consumer and data protection
  • Network and informations systems security

A whistleblower must use designated reporting channels and believe the information was true at the time of reporting.

The EU Directive requires effective and secure reporting channels to be put in place to make internal whistleblowing possible.

Organisations must ensure that their internal reporting channels meet specific criteria. This includes ease of access, ownership and management, security, GDPR and how reports are made. 

The objective is to fight corruption and offer better protection to persons who report misconduct or breaches of Union law. 

You’ll need secure reporting channels in place. In other words, somewhere secure for your employees and other people closely connected to your business to raise concerns about unethical behaviour.

The channels must meet several requirements set out in the Directive, such as guaranteeing confidentiality, being easily accessible and meeting GDPR guidelines. 

The Directive only applies to private and public organisations in the EU with 50 or more employees.

Additionally, private companies operating in certain sectors, such as financial services or those vulnerable to money laundering or terrorist financing, need to comply.

The EU Directive on the protection of whistleblowers does not set minimum penalties, but it requires national versions of the law to penalise against those who prevent reporting, break confidentiality, or retaliate against whistleblowers.

No. It also applies to municipalities in the EU with over 10,000 inhabitants.

This is in addition to any organisation, no matter whether it is private or a public organisation with more than 50 employees in the EU.

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Our team is ready to answer your questions. Find the answer by visiting our support centre, or fill out the form below and we'll be in touch as soon as possible. Or simply give us a call!

Talk with Territory Manager
Annelie Demred

0046 (0)706 83 82 88

HAPPY TO MEET YOU!

Get in touch

Our team is ready to answer your questions. Find the answer by visiting our support centre, or fill out the form below and we'll be in touch as soon as possible. Or simply give us a call!

Talk with Territory Manager
Annelie Demred

0046 (0)706 83 82 88